Mushroom
Mushroom
Mushroom
Mushroom
Mushroom
Mushroom
Mushroom
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Mushroom

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Carved mushrooms are showing up more and more in shops. There are many superstitions about the mushroom. There are beliefs that link mushrooms with witches, fairies, Native Americans, and Christmas!

The word toadstool is used to refer to a poisonous or inedible variety of mushroom. The toadstool Amanita muscaria is the most iconic mushroom. With its brilliant crimson cap spotted with white, it has been used in Christmas cards and in art as fairy dwellings.

In Germany and other parts of Central and Eastern Europe the Amanita muscaria or Glückspilz is a symbol of good luck. At New Year’s a chimney sweep is seen distributing these good luck mushrooms along with four-leaf clovers. The mushroom frequently is found growing underneath pine trees. There is some speculation that the red and white of Christmas and use of pine trees may be linked to these humble fungi. The Amanita muscaria is also the most common mushroom depicted in fairy ring art. However, fairy rings can be formed by any circle of mushrooms.

In England and Ireland, they are tied to death and decay, and fear surrounds these potential poisonous florae. They are known as Satan’s fruit and linked to witches or fairies. In Eastern Europe they are held in higher esteem, seen as a valuable food source with some varieties being revered. (information taken from supernaturallyspeaking.com)